Innovations in Biology and Technology

Afolabi Aibor

UMGC/BIO 103

11/13/2022

 

 

 

Sources.

Tabotabo-Picardal, M., &Paño, J. D. (2018). Facilitating instruction of central dogma of molecular biology through contextualization. Journal of Teacher Education and Research13(2), 118. https://doi.org/10.5958/2454-1664.2018.00012.5

This is the article by Tabotabo-Picardal&Paño(2018) named Facilitating Instruction of Central Dogma of Molecular Biology through Contextualization. The purpose of this research was to see how well students understood the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology, a complicated scientific subject. We wished to improve our abilities. It was given to 10-year-olds in a rural secondary school in science class. To assess understanding, efficiency, and excitement, researchers employed pre- and post-test questionnaires, a performance indicator checklist, and an attitude, interest, and behavior inventory. A paired t-test was used to compare pre- and post-test scores. Students lacked conceptual and manipulative abilities prior to the intervention. Following contextualized instruction, students improved. The moderate enthusiasm of respondents suggests that the method improved students’ attitudes toward the material. Pearson’s r calculated the correlation between the three variables. Engagement does not correlate with comprehension or performance. This method is effective in teaching science, particularly genetics, because it personalizes the material for each student through contextualized instruction.

 

Iwasaki, A., & Omer, S. B. (2020). Why and how vaccines work. Cell, 183(2), 290-295. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2020.09.040

Iwasaki and Omer (2020) explore the effectiveness of vaccines. This credible source is critical to our study since it describes how immunizations prevent infectious illnesses. Many lives have been saved as a result of antibiotics and vaccines. To save lives, researchers throughout the globe are working to produce a safe and effective Covid-19 vaccine. Vaccinations, according to the source, boost the immune system to target disease-causing bacteria. Vaccines include inactive antigens that cause an immunological response. The antigen in new immunizations is missing, but the recipe is included. T lymphocytes, macrophages, and B lymphocytes are used by the immune system to combat infections. Vaccines stimulate the immune system to fight a simulated sickness. This mimicry aids the immune system in the future battle against comparable illnesses. Minor adverse effects, like as fever, are to be expected while the body builds immunity.

 

Huang, Q., Zeng, J., & Yan, J. (2021). COVID-19 mRNA vaccines. Journal of Genetics and Genomics48(2), 107-114. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jgg.2021.02.006

As the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and its unprecedented disruptive consequences on economies and societies all over the globe have shown, there is an urgent need for immunizations that are both safe and effective. Taking advantage of the vaccines’ flexibility and speed, late-stage clinical testing for COVID-19 has been completed at a record rate, and two mRNA vaccines have been shown to be effective against the virus. In this review, they discuss recently published data on potential COVID-19 mRNA vaccines, with a focus on those now being tested in clinical trials, and evaluate potential challenges for the future.

 

 

Outline.

Topic: Vaccines

Thesis: Science has demonstrated the safety of vaccines.

Topic 1: How vaccines work

  • Lessen the impact and severity of infectious illnesses
  • Cells with long-term memories.
  • Vaccine classifications.

Topic 2: A discussion of the mRNA vaccine and its use.

  • Significance of messenger RNA in protein synthesis.
  • provides a source of virally encoded mRNA
  • Required clearance from the Food and Drug Administration

Topic 3: Vaccinating Children as Part of the Regular Routine.

  • Vaccine and its purpose

 

 

References.

Huang, Q., Zeng, J., & Yan, J. (2021). COVID-19 mRNA vaccines. Journal of Genetics and Genomics, 48(2), 107-114. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jgg.2021.02.006

Iwasaki, A., & Omer, S. B. (2020). Why and how vaccines work. Cell, 183(2), 290-295. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2020.09.040

Tabotabo-Picardal, M., &Paño, J. D. (2018). Facilitating instruction of central dogma of molecular biology through contextualization. Journal of Teacher Education and Research13(2), 118. https://doi.org/10.5958/2454-1664.2018.00012.5

 

 

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